Eliud Kipchoge running

No human is limited: Eliud Kipchoge calls for renewed action to end malaria

Eliud Kipchoge believes that we can beat malaria, in his home country of Kenya and across Africa -- and that if we all work together, we can see a malaria-free world in a generation.

"To say no human is limited, it means a lot of things. It means that I’m trying to tell you that you should dare to try the unthinkable."

 Known across the world as the greatest marathon runner of our time, Kenyan athlete Eliud Kipchoge is a force to be reckoned with. He knows better than anyone that when someone tells you something isn’t possible, that’s not a roadblock: it’s a challenge to rise above. Eliud is the first person in history to run a marathon in under two hours and his approach to ending malaria is no different.

Portrait image of Eliud Kipchoge

"You know I am a believer of ‘no human is limited’ ...Personally, I believe that we can kick malaria out of our world - because I am a believer of change, I am a believer of trying to do something that people don’t think is possible."

Just like training for a marathon, the fight against malaria has been a long battle of endurance and a test of commitment. For decades we have seen moments of incredible, groundbreaking progress, victories, moments where we’ve fallen behind, and challenges that seemed impossible to overcome.  

For too long now, malaria has been a heavy burden on the people it affects, especially young children. “Malaria has actually stolen our lives, it has stolen our time… it has stolen our relatives, our kids, it has stolen many things,” says Eliud. “So I’m involved to make sure malaria doesn't steal our futures anymore.”  

In Kenya, thousands of lives are lost every year to malaria, and millions are affected by the disease. Growing up in rural Kenya, Eliud experienced malaria and saw the effects it had on his local community and the country as a whole. “I’ve been affected by malaria when I was young, and even when I was at 17-18 years.” 

Eliud being painted by artist Láolú NYC

"Malaria has actually stolen our lives, it has stolen our time… it has stolen our relatives, our kids, it has stolen many things ... I’m involved to make sure malaria doesn't steal our futures anymore."

Believe it or not, even Olympic Gold Medalist Eliud has been held back by malaria. “Personally, I have had malaria many times. I had malaria one time when I qualified for the IAAF World Junior Championships team in Jamaica in 2002, and I could not manage to go because I was really sick.” Eliud was unable to represent Kenya at the championships, another challenge he overcame in his early career.  

For Eliud, it’s vital we spread the word that malaria is preventable and treatable, and this is a race we can and will finish. Now, he’s calling on youth to take charge of their futures and to join the call to end malaria in a generation. 

"I urge young people to join this world changing cause… It’s important that we reach zero malaria because this disease steals life. And each life is precious. Please join me and take a minute to show your support and draw your own line now!"

Together, we are truly unlimited. There is nothing we can’t achieve with commitment, leadership and community action. Join Eliud Kipchoge and Draw The Line Against Malaria today. 

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Building on the Zero Malaria Starts With Me movement

A deadly disease is stealing our future

We can be the generation that ends malaria

Building on the Zero Malaria Starts With Me movement

A deadly disease is stealing our future

We can be the generation that ends malaria

Draw the line now